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Difference between revisions of "Seminars"

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== Tentative Speakers ==
 
== Tentative Speakers ==
  
'''May 9'''
+
'''May 30'''
* Speaker:
+
* Affiliation:
+
* Host:
+
* Title:
+
* Abstract:
+
 
+
'''May 16'''
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* Speaker: tim lewis
 
* Speaker: tim lewis
 
* Affiliation: uc davis
 
* Affiliation: uc davis
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* Abstract:
 
* Abstract:
  
'''May 23'''
+
'''Aug 1'''
* Speaker: tim lewis
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* Speaker: Carol Whitney
* Affiliation: uc davis
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* Affiliation: U Maryland
* Host: thomas
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* Host: Bruno
* Title:  
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* Title: What can Visual Word Recognition Tell us about Visual Object Recognition?
* Abstract:
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* Abstract: The SERIOL model addresses the problem of how the brain encodes the
 
+
sequence of letters in a written word. It provides a neurobiologically
'''May 30'''
+
plausible account of how the initial retinotopic representation of a string
* Speaker: tim lewis
+
is progressively converted into an abstract, location-invariant encoding
* Affiliation: uc davis
+
of letter order, and  has led to new accounts of visual half-field
* Host: thomas
+
asymmetries in lexical decision, which have been experimentally confirmed.
* Title:
+
In the model, location-invariance is achieved by mapping space into
* Abstract:
+
time. That is, the retinotopic encoding is converted into a temporal encoding.
 +
Relative timing of firing of letter pairs is then used to activate bigram
 +
representations. If indeed the brain uses such mechanisms in visual word
 +
recognition, they would have to be derived from the mechanisms normally used
 +
in visual object recognition. I will discuss how this approach could be
 +
extended to object recognition in general, and touch upon some data from
 +
the literature that are consistent with this proposal.
  
 
== Previous Seminars ==
 
== Previous Seminars ==

Revision as of 03:30, 24 May 2006

Instructions

  1. Check the internal calendar for a free seminar slot.
  2. Make a note on this page in the Tentative Speakers section that you are going to invite a speaker. Please include your name and email as host in case somebody wants to contact you.
  3. Invite a speaker.
  4. As soon as the speaker confirms, put the information in the Confirmed Speakers section.
  5. Put the date into the internal calendar
  6. Notify kilian [1] that we have a confirmed speaker so that I can update the web page. Please include title and abstract.
  7. Notify Pachelle [2] about the seminar date.

--Kilian 21:48, 4 November 2005 (PST)

Tentative Speakers

May 30

  • Speaker: tim lewis
  • Affiliation: uc davis
  • Host: thomas
  • Title:
  • Abstract:

Aug 1

  • Speaker: Carol Whitney
  • Affiliation: U Maryland
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: What can Visual Word Recognition Tell us about Visual Object Recognition?
  • Abstract: The SERIOL model addresses the problem of how the brain encodes the

sequence of letters in a written word. It provides a neurobiologically plausible account of how the initial retinotopic representation of a string is progressively converted into an abstract, location-invariant encoding of letter order, and has led to new accounts of visual half-field asymmetries in lexical decision, which have been experimentally confirmed. In the model, location-invariance is achieved by mapping space into time. That is, the retinotopic encoding is converted into a temporal encoding. Relative timing of firing of letter pairs is then used to activate bigram representations. If indeed the brain uses such mechanisms in visual word recognition, they would have to be derived from the mechanisms normally used in visual object recognition. I will discuss how this approach could be extended to object recognition in general, and touch upon some data from the literature that are consistent with this proposal.

Previous Seminars

November 22, 2005

  • Speaker: Scott Makeig
  • Affiliation: Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience, Institute for Neural Computation, UCSD
  • Title: Viewing event-related brain dynamics from the top down

November 29, 2005

  • Speaker: Stanley Klein
  • Affiliation: School of Optometry, UC Berkeley
  • Title: Limits of Vision and psychophysical methods (video)

December 6, 2005

December 13, 2005

  • Speaker: Paul Rhodes
  • Affiliation: Stanford University
  • Title: Simulations of a thalamocortical column with compartment model cells and dynamic synapses (video)

January 3

  • Speaker: Dan Butts
  • Affiliation: Harvard University
  • Host: Thomas
  • Title: "Temporal hyperacuity": visual neuron function at millisecond time resolution

January 17

  • Speaker: Erhardt Barth
  • Affiliation: Institute for Neuro- and Bioinformatics, Luebeck, Germany
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Guiding eye movements for better communication (video)

January 23 (Monday)

  • Speaker: Read Montague
  • Affiliation: Baylor College of Medicine
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Abstract plans and reward signals in a multi-round trust game

February 7

  • Speaker: Christian Wehrhahn
  • Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen, Germany
  • Host: Tony
  • Title: Seeing blindsight: motion at isoluminance?

February 14

  • Speaker: Jack Cowan
  • Affiliation: U Chicago
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Spontaneous pattern formation in large scale brain activity: what visual migraines and hallucinations tell us about the brain (video)

February 21

  • Speaker: Gerard Rinkus
  • Affiliation: Brandeis University
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Hierarchical Sparse Distributed Representations of Sequence Recall and Recognition (video)

February 28

  • Speaker: Dario Ringach
  • Affiliation: UCLA
  • Host: thomas
  • Title: Population dynamics in primary visual cortex

March 7

  • Speaker: Michael Wu
  • Affiliation: Gallant lab/UC Berkeley
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: A Unified Framework for Receptive Field Estimation

March 14

  • Speaker: Mate Lengyel
  • Affiliation: Gatsby Unit/UCL London
  • Host: fritz
  • Title: Firing rates and phases in the hippocampus: what are they good for? (video)

March 15

  • Speaker: Mate Lengyel
  • Affiliation: Gatsby Unit/UCL London
  • Host: fritz
  • Title: Bayesian model learning in human visual perception (video)

March 21

  • Speaker: Mark Schnitzer
  • Affiliation: Stanford University
  • Host: Amir
  • Title: In vivo microendoscopy and computational modeling studies of mammalian brain circuits

April 4

  • Speaker: Odelia Schwartz
  • Affiliation: The Salk Institute
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Natural images and cortical representation

April 10

  • Speaker: Charles Anderson
  • Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: A Comparison of Neurobiological and Digital Computation (video)

April 11

  • Speaker: Charles Anderson
  • Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Population Coding in V1 (video)

April 18

  • Speaker: Risto Miikkulainen
  • Affiliation: The University of Texas at Austin
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Computational maps in the visual cortex (video)

May 2

  • Speaker: Dileep George
  • Affiliation: Numenta
  • Host: Bruno
  • Title: Hierarchical, cortical memory architecture for pattern recognition

Confirmed Speakers

June 20

  • Speaker: Vincent Bonin
  • Affiliation: Smith Kettlewell Institute
  • Host: Thomas
  • Title:
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