HOME MISSION AND RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS PEOPLE SEMINARS CONTACT

Stanley Klein
School of Optometry, UC Berkeley and Vision Science and Neuroscience Graduate Groups

Limits of Vision and psychophysical methods

Tuesday 29th of November 2005 at 04:00pm
5101 Tolman

I was asked to present our psychophysics research that has relevance to computational neuroscience. Since I'm local I thought it best to give a brief overview of several of our past projects. People can easily contact me or look at the publications for more details. My goal is to show how psychophysics can be a powerful neuroscience tool.

1) Perception vs. psychophysics. How to measure subjectivity objectively. I'll present a brief introduction to signal detection theory and how one can remove subjective biases from experimental results. I'll introduce the topic of optimal approaches for measuring the psychometric function. http://cornea.berkeley.edu/pubs/01-11_PERCEPTION_AND_PSYCHOPHYSICS-Measuring_estimating_and_understanding_the_psychometric_function.pdf

2) Double Judgment Psychophysics provides a powerful, but easily misused tool for exploring interactions among mechanisms. Exotic mechanisms vs exotic decisions will be discussed. http://cornea.berkeley.edu/pubs/34.pdf

3) The Guinness record for vision involves a position task with a close reference. Spatial vision modeling indicates that mechanisms localized in space and spatial frequency are used with surprisingly minimal gain control. Scale-space maps are presented showing vision may be similar to audition. http://cornea.berkeley.edu/pubs/33.pdf

4) Minimizing space-spatial frequency uncertainty. Why Gabor was wrong! http://cornea.berkeley.edu/pubs/63.pdf

5) Temporal dynamics of machine-like ganglion cells with context dependence of firing time. The stimulus was a pair of binary white noise stimuli, flashing on the center and the surround of a ganglion cell's receptive field. The state of the stimulus more than 90 msec in the past reliably shifted the timing of spikes by a few msec. http://cornea.berkeley.edu/pubs/OptimizingEstimationNonlinearKernelsSKlein.zip

6) Rate coding vs. time coding of information. Does the 1 msec temporal asynchrony of moving vernier acuity rule out rate coding? These experiments on moving 3-dot vernier stimuli pull together insights from above items #1, 3 and 5. http://cornea.berkeley.edu/pubs/89.pdf


(video)


Join Email List

You can subscribe to our weekly seminar email list by sending an email to majordomo@lists.berkeley.edu that contains the words subscribe redwood in the body of the message.
(Note: The subject line can be arbitrary and will be ignored)